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Studies show: gamers have better K/D ratio with higher FPS

Nvidia seems to have put a whole heap of research into this subject, and also graced us with heaps of graphs, infographics, and easy to digest information regarding high FPS and the gaming advantages it brings. Not alone in the study by any means, with Linus & friends from Linus Tech Tips also studying the field.

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Graphics Card Roundup (2019 December)

Back again due to popular demand! Another edition of GPU roundup so you can make a more informed decision when customising your next gaming PC.

Custom Gaming PC Graphics Card Prices vs. Passmark Score

Not much has changed compared to last roundup. Prices went up, and have come back down to just under where they previously sat. Nvidia has released a few new variants of GPUs for us to choose from, but apart from more choices, nothing too exciting.

Due to the GT 1030 and GTX 1050 Ti’s lower performance values and high price points, we have removed them from our Custom Gaming PC lineups.

They will be removed from future roundups as a result.

Although this makes for more expensive gaming PCs, it also ensures more compelling and capable gaming PCs for our gaming oriented customers. We’d prefer this than potentially misleading customers into believing they’re getting good value when they may not be happy with the very low-end price/performance the cards offered.

Speaking of price to performance…

Passmark Points per Dollar

Green for Nvidia GeForce cards, Red for AMD Radeon cards.

The combination of these graphs tells us that Nvidia is currently dominating the graphics card market. No surprises there. However, it appears that if you were wanting to spend under between $700-$800 on a graphics card, your best bet should be the RX 5700 XT, which is probably the only time we’d recommend AMD over Nvidia. There’s a bit more to the story though, such as each individual game performing differently, as well as different resolution setting as well as level of detail, and also the other hardware going with the PC! Finally, Nvidia is generally better at releasing updated drivers for game releases, and often sees better gaming performance due to this.

So, GTX 1650 Super is the best value – let’s make all PCs with this graphics card! Not so fast. Just because something represents great value for money doesn’t mean it’s suited to your needs. For instance, an entry level small-sized car is great value, but isn’t well suited to racing, moving large items, etc.

The majority of our customers are satisfied enough with the performance an RTX 2060 Super offers. But there’s always those few who will settle for nothing less than the best, which is currently only achieved with Nvidia’s RTX 2080 Ti. Sadly though, Nvidia knows nobody competes with them at the high end, so they’re dictating a high premium on the high performing GPUs. This is not Evatech’s doing!

If you’re after something high end without what we consider “overspending” then the RTX 2070 Super is likely the one for you.

But everyone is different. If you have any questions, or just want to get some tailored advice, get in touch with our friendly staff. Or try your hand at customising your own gaming PC!

If you’re just after a graphics card, check out the insanely (good) priced Colorful range we have. GTX 1660, GTX 1660 Super, RTX 2060, RTX 2060 Super, RTX 2070 Super, and RTX 2080 Super and VERY limited stock of RTX 2080 Ti. Strictly while stocks last. So get in quick!

Evatech staff are constantly updating component pricing as supplier pricing changes due to new shipments, or market changes. At all times we do our best to deliver the lowest prices to customers.

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Microsoft Flight Simulator 2020

Coming in 2020 (next year!) Microsoft Flight Simulator is the next iteration of one of the most loved simulation games. Featuring everything from light planes to wide-body jets, you’ll fly highly detailed aircraft in an incredibly realistic world. Create your flight plan and fly anywhere on the planet. Enjoy flying day or night and face realistic, challenging weather conditions.

The game will support 4K and HDR, catering to next gen-consoles and high end PC gamers. Releasing on Windows 10 (PC) in 2020, and Xbox One at a later date, and also available on Xbox Game Pass.

It’ll be 14 years since the previous Flight Simulator release back in 2006 (not including the 2014 Steam release which was the same title). And from the looks of things, Microsoft has been hard at work at least some of this time.

What took so long?

As already stated, the game will enable you to fly all over the world. To pull this off, Microsoft is using data from Bing Maps, and highly detailed satelite imagery. It will be able to generate photorealistic 3D models of buildings, trees, and terrain. The game will also have realistic physics and utilise real world weather data. For example, if it’s raining somewhere in real life: it will be raining there in game. Invidual clouds will have their own characterstics, resulting in different impacts on the aircraft. There’s animals. And Flight Simulator will even populate roads with vehicles, water will flow realistically based on wind direction, trees will have individual leaves. The game, like Earth, has over 2 million cities, and over 45,000 airports.

The size of this game is way, way, way larger than you have the space for. But this hasn’t stopped Microsoft. Instead of downloading the entire game (more than 2PB [petabytes], or 2 million GB), you will stream the data from their servers. In the settings, you’ll be able to allocate a certain amount of storage to cache, and also pre-load data required for a flight. You will be able to play in offline mode. It’s basically Flight Simulator on demand style. Or Netflix style. Everywhere will be at the tips of your fingers.

Yes, you’ll be able to find your house.

Coming soon, get ready!

To date, there are no hardware requirements mentioned. But, given it’s coming to Xbox One, minimum requirements shouldn’t be too high. However, to be able to play at the photorealistic graphics settings, 4K, HDR, and a high frame rate: you’ll likely need something extremely up to date, and high end.

With requirements not even hinted at yet, you can be assured that this game will be on our radar. Pun very much intended. We’ll be back with updates for this game. Previous Flight Simulator titles have been huge driving forces for customers buying gaming PCs from us, so we know this is a popular game.

If you pressured me for a guess at what hardware would run this game decently from current the generation?
i5 9600K / R5 3600, 16GB RAM, 500GB of free storage space, and Nvidia RTX 2060. Or higher, of course.

You can customise and buy your very own gaming PC today!

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Graphics Card Roundup (2019 September)

It can be hard to work out which graphics card (GPU) to pair with your new gaming PC. So we’re hoping that once you get done viewing this article, your decision is easier.

Custom Gaming PC Graphics Card Prices vs. Passmark Score

Red indicates AMD Radeon. Green indicates Nvidia GeForce.

So everything’s pretty in line, the more you pay the better performance you can expect. And this is something we always tell customers.

A note that we don’t recommend that anyone buys a GT 1030 with cutting edge gaming in mind. You’re setting yourself up for a bad time if that’s your thinking. This is purely graphics card price, you will need a system to go with it.

Passmark Points per Dollar

Red indicates AMD Radeon. Green indicates Nvidia GeForce.

What’s clear from this is the GTX 1660 represents highest performance for your dollar. Bang for your buck, if you prefer.

So let’s customise a gaming PC with an Nvidia GTX 1660! Right?
Not necessarily.

Just because something represents great value for money, doesn’t mean it is suited to your needs. For instance, an entry level small-sized car is great value, but isn’t well suited to racing, moving large items, etc.

The majority of our customers are satisfied enough with the performance an RTX 2060 Super offers. But there’s always those few who will settle for nothing less than the best, which is currently only achieved with Nvidia’s RTX 2080 Ti.

If you’re after something high end without what we consider “overspending” then the RTX 2070 Super is likely the one for you. To back that up, here’s another visual to consider.

RTX 2070 Super comes in at the last point before the trend line gets ignored, and Nvidia’s prices skyrocket without the performance to keep its value

But everyone is different. If you have any questions, or just want to get some tailored advice. Get in touch with our friendly staff. Or try your hand at customising your own gaming PC!

If you’re just after a graphics card, check out the insanely (good) priced Colorful range we have. RTX 2060 Super, RTX 2070 Super, and RTX 2080 Super. Strictly while stocks last. So get in quick!

Evatech staff are constantly updating component pricing as supplier pricing changes due to new shipments, or market changes. At all times we do our best to deliver the lowest prices to customers.

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Need For Speed Heat – Coming to PC November 8th

EA’s fan favourite racing gaming is back and with it, so are the cops! The November 2019 release will come to PC in the form of an Origin store download. Of course as with most major EA titles there will be a standard and deluxe version and pre-order bonuses.

The last Need for Speed release was in 2017 with Payback but fans were mostly disappointed. The open world had a 24 hour day-night cycle and three playable characters but reviewers were not overly positive. Citing the ‘free-roam’ aspect as unengaging and the ‘missions’ as repetitive the average review on metacritic landing around 6/10.

You have to go back to 2013 before the franchise had a positively reviewed release with ‘Rivals’, the first to allow playable control of the police and only one year after the fan favourite ‘Most Wanted’. Will Heat deliver for the fans who have been holding out for 6 years?

What is NFS : Heat

Not a lot is know this early, but here is what we do know.

Set in ‘Palm’ city, the locale seems to be a fictional version of Miami, much like GTA’s Vice City, complete with wide open freeways lined palm trees and plenty of neon purple.

Car modification is of course a staple of the franchise and still is for NFS Heat. Hopefully the aesthetics (paint jobs, decals, giant oversized spoilers etc) aren’t monetised or loot boxed, but with EA’s track record it’s always possible.

The trailer suggests the game play will be split between track and street races, the later taking place at night and involving cop chases, with the former in broad daylight without them.

Checkout the Trailer.

The Cars

From the trailer alone we know the Polestar 1, BMW i8 Coupe and Mercedes C63 AMG are all in the mix. We also spotted a Chevy Corvette Grand Sport, Nissan GT-R and Mitsubishi Lancer Evo X. There will be plenty more to add to the roster but we’ll have to wait for future announcements for that.

System Requirements

EA and Origin haven’t yet published official PC hardware systems requirements for the game at this stage but as soon as they do we’ll be updating this post.

Do we think it will it have real time ray tracing (RTX) support? The emphasis on the street light reflections on the wet street in the trailer seem to suggest it might! Let’s hope it does as most of us of us sunk hundreds in to our new RTX GPUs finished Metro Exodus a while ago.

When will we know more?

Gamescom is right around the corner. We expect a few more details to be flushed out at the show with the rest to come in bite sized chunks evenly spread out between now and the release.

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3rd Gen AMD Ryzen Custom Gaming PCs

X570 AND THE AMD 3200G | 3400G | 3600 | 3600X | 3700X | 3800X | 3900X

After more than a decade of Intel and it’s Core series CPU ruling the market in gaming performance, AMD’s third-gen Ryzen 3000 series looks to put AMD right back in the mix. If the expected leap forward in performance and power efficiency from the new 7nm process is true, it will break Intel’s long lived lead in not only per core performance, but power efficiency, heat and core count.

The top of the range

Sitting among the top of the pack are the R7 and all new R9 series CPUs

  • 3700X 8-Core 16-Thread @ 4.4GHz (R7)
  • 3800X 8-Core 16-Thread @ 4.5GHz (R7)
  • 3900X 12-Core 24-Thread @ 4.7GHz (R9)

Aimed to take on the i7 and i9’s from Intel, they come packed with more cores and more threads. The expectation is that they will come close if not match Intel in their per-core performance and blow them out of the water in multi-threaded workloads that make use of the additional cores/threads.

The rest of the stack

Rounding out the full offering of third generation Ryzen CPUs are the R5’s and R3’s.

  • 3200G 4-Core 4-Thread 4GHz (R3)
  • 3400G 4-Core 8-Thread 4.2GHz (R3)
  • 3600 6-Core 12-Thread 4.2GHz (R5)
  • 3600X 6-Core 12-Thread 4.4GHz (R5)

Of course these are aimed squarely (as the name would suggest) at the i3 and i5 line up from Intel offering a matching core count but double the thread-count. What’s the G stand for? Graphics presumably? These are AMD’s “APUs”. Simply put they sport integrated graphics powered by Vega. Expected to plenty enough for basic gaming at 1080p. Yet unknown as to how well they will stand up against newer more demanding games. If budget gaming PCs are something you’re interested in, keep an eye out for benchmarks and reviews come July 7th.

But wait, there’s more!

Announced earlier in the week, launching later in the year is the true flagship model of the generation. A 16-core 32-thread R9 CPU dubbed the R9 3950X. Doubling the core count of the Intel i9 9900K. If you’re a gamer we wouldn’t recommend waiting for it. The in-game performance of the 16-core chip is unlikely to be much different than it’s 12 core little brother at the same clock speeds. Games just simply don’t utilize that many cores. However if your also in to multimedia production, video editing, data crunching or any workloads that will actually put those threads to work, maybe holding off a few more months is the way to go.

Ryezn 9 3950X CPU

The Kicker [X570 Motherboards]

Dispute the CPUs being very competitively priced, to run it on it’s intended chipset you might have to pay more than you hoped. The X570 range (replacing the X470) is expected to be in the realm of $100-150 more than their counterparts. Why? Well, being on the bleeding edge can be pricey and the all new 7nm chipset, being the first of it’s kind to use PCI-E gen 4 the reason.

Later in the year the more budget friendly B550 chipset motherboards are expected. Until then however motherboard manufacturers are advising strongly against pairing the new R7 or R9 series CPUs with previous generation boards. There is good news for those with tighter budgets however. The R5 and R3 CPUs are expected to run perfectly fine on last-gen boards due to their more modest power draw and core count. That being said, we still don’t know how much the B550 boards will cost and what features they will include.

Ryzen X570 Motherboards

So should your next PC be a Ryzen 3rd Gen one?

With only a couple of short weeks away from launch, you won’t need to wait long to find out. From the ‘official’ performance data shown by AMD (to be taken with a grain of salt) there is a lot to like. If you’re purely gaming, the Intel line up may still be way to go at certain price points. Prices on both sides may be slightly adjusted in the weeks after launch as each fight for your dollar.

Once the dust settles, Intel may still hold the crown for purely top end in-game performance. But will it be enough? If the lead is narrow enough, the dominating multi-threaded performance for non-gaming work loads may be enough to sway a large percentage of buyers over to AMD for the first time in a very, very long time.

Where can you buy your very own Ryzen 3000 powered custom PC?

As usual, here at Evatech we’re again proudly the first to offer the Ryzen 3000 in our custom PCs. Purchasable in store or online at www.evatech.com.au you can lock in your pre-order today and be among the first in the world to get their hands on a brand new PC powered by 3rd gen 7nm Ryzen and PCI-E 4.

Our world leading online custom PC builder is easy, powerful, always up to date and now fully mobile friendly! Check it out today, customize your next dream PC online and get it delivered to your doorstep anywhere in Australia.

Our team of seasoned PC hardware professionals build, setup and burn in test every PC as if it was their very own.

Shop today at www.evatech.com.au

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Evatech at Computex 2019

Evatech is scoping the latest, greatest, and wackiest products and trends coming out of this year’s Computex. Look at some of the pictures below.

LED displays, RGB and all things bright lights

Some of the wacky

Some of the little-bit-more normal

To help you feel like you’re really there…

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Game Streaming: The Pitfalls & Potential (Google Stadia explored)

You might have heard about Google’s announcement last week: Stadia. What it promises is without a doubt impressive. However, there’s a long way to go before we’ll be concerned about gamers turning away from full blown gaming PCs in favour of game streaming. In case you’ve missed it, here’s what it is in a nutshell.

What does Stadia promise?

  • Almost any device with an internet connection can game
  • While watching game footage, click a button to start playing the game and be gaming in about 5 seconds
  • 4K (3840×2160, or 4x as much as 1080p) gaming at 60 frames per second (FPS) + HDR
  • “State share” allows viewers of Stadia stream to launch to the same save state as the gamer
  • Compatible with USB controllers, but Google will also provide their own controller with lower latency
  • Subscription based service
  • Potential to eventually support 8K gaming at 120 FPS
  • Release in 2019

The above means for some very compelling positive points:

  • Game practically anywhere, any time
  • Launch a game without any downloads, installs, updates
  • No specialised hardware necessary

So wait, why isn’t Evatech worried?

It’s no secret that we have made a business out of providing gaming PCs for gamers Australia wide. Google’s Stadia announcement may well eat into our customer base. But here’s why we’re not bothered…

The biggest reason

Google has only laid out plans for launching this year in the US, Canada, and Europe. Australians will have to wait.

Australian Internet

Remember that in Australia most of us struggle for good internet at home via wired solutions. The days of game streaming at 1080p 60FPS over a home ADSL/cable/NBN or a mobile data connection are far off in the future. More on why later in this post.

Furthermore, lately the trend of gamers going for resolutions greater than 1080p and/or more than 60FPS is skyrocketing. You might be thinking “But I can stream Netflix 1080p/4K no worries!” – firstly you’re in the minority. Secondly, almost all movie/TV footage is about 24 FPS. That’s less than half the amount of 60 FPS. Thirdly, streaming a movie or TV show is known data. By that I mean your device can pre-load the next 30 seconds, or few minutes of the video file so that in case your internet connection is patchy, it has a bit of a “buffer” to work with so that you hopefully experience a perfect stream.

A game on the other hand, cannot be pre-loaded. If you decide to jump, shoot, run, or (sadly) die from one second to the next, there are way too many possibilities for Google to pre-load for you, meaning it’s all live, all the time.

But, games on demand!

The games. Although it would be easier to say “the lack of games”, because all we’ve got confirmed so far is Assassin’s Creed Odyssey and Doom Eternal. Interestingly this raises another point. Since Stadia is based on Linux and some specialised hardware. Likening it more to a new breed of console than a regular home PC running Windows 10 and Steam (or whatever other game store). This may offer a new barrier to entry for game developers/publishers, meaning Stadia may not get all the latest and greatest games if there isn’t a large enough player base to warrant the hard work and effort.

What if it has everything I want, and I have great internet?

Input lag & latency

There’s a tiny (mostly negligible) amount of input lag on a gaming PC sat just 30cm away from you as you game. This is the delay between you pressing a button on your keyboard/mouse/controller and the corresponding action appearing on screen. Modern gaming peripherals and hardware do well to almost negate this entirely.

When it comes to pressing a button in your house, the signal going to your PC, your PC sending it to Google via whichever servers it needs to bounce off to reach Google, Stadia’s servers to process your button press and then pass the output (video) back to you again via the same avenues, there’s going to be a noticeable delay. Google says they have worked to minimise it, but those who have tested it are saying it is most certainly there, to the point of it being a deal-breaker. Note that a lot of gamers these days are playing first-person shooters, where reaction timing is everything. More input lag than your competition puts you at an instant up-front disadvantage. Playing games should be fun, not frustrating by design.

People are increasingly becoming wary of large corporations, such as Google & Facebook

There’s been what seems like news story after news story about the world’s largest companies engaging in shady activities. Some result in lawsuits, fines, and some just make people really uncomfortable due to their privacy being exploited. Stadia has raised some valid questions: what about game mods? How long are games available for (if not indefinite)? What if Google decides Stadia isn’t sustainable, and wants to shut down the service as it has with many, many other once-large services?

Internet (again)

It might be hard to think back to a time before the likes of Netflix, Stan, Amazon Prime, etc. Do you remember? Internet speeds for the most part slower than what we have right now, granted. But the max theoretical speeds were usually reached on a daily basis. Since the rise of streaming services like Netflix, Australian Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have struggled to give everyone their maximum connection speeds (sustained), especially during peak times.

Why? Most of the population get home from their day of school, university, or work from about 3pm to 7pm. As more and more people get home, they are able to give their attention to a screen of their choice, and the easiest one is a TV connected to the internet to watch some TV series, or perhaps a movie, or maybe even some YouTube. While that’s on, you might also browse through Facebook, news, or Reddit. That’s fine too – your internet can very likely handle this because the video content is being pre-loaded.

Now remember that this is happening at every other house in your street. The streets connecting your street to main roads. Every house in your suburb. Plus a few of your neighbouring suburbs. For some Australians, that’s the amount of houses that rely on just one internet node/exchange. Somewhere along the line, no matter how close to home, or how far from home, there will be a bottleneck. Too much data to go out and come back in to keep up with, so everyone’s speeds often get slowed down so that everyone is able to maintain some type of connection. This is what most ISPs now refer to as “evening speed”.

Why does any of the above matter?

That’s how life is in today’s world of streaming Netflix, YouTube, etc. Now picture that same scenario, only that maybe 1/4 of those people who would usually stream video are now interested in streaming live games that they are playing. So, 1/4 of the population using 2x (or more) the amount of bandwidth. That’s a significant increase in internet traffic and bandwidth utilisation. Something I just cannot fathom Australian internet infrastructure keeping up with. Let’s also remember Australian internet has pretty tight data caps. 1 hour of Netflix HD (1080p @ 25FPS) will use about 6GB of data. Let’s double that to get to 50 FPS (still 10 short of 60), and that’s 12GB of data an hour. 3 hours of gaming a day, 5 times a week, over the course of a month? 720GB in just game streaming.

Great idea, just… not for everyone

While it will allow people to jump right into games at the drop of a hat (ignoring the internet problem for a moment), it’s not the end of gaming PCs. Competitive gaming will still be done on real physical gaming machines. Ones that cater to professional gamers’ requirement for high refresh rate, low latency, “no excuses” hardware to play their games and earn their living. Anyone serious about gaming will likely stick with real hardware, like we have now.

For what it’s worth, American multinational retail company Walmart is also reportedly looking at game streaming. So there may be more options in the future, with all the same pitfalls we imagine.

Also remember. A gaming PC is more than just for playing games. You can do homework, assignments, research, video editing, office work, etc. Gaming PCs are far from being replaced.

Hopefully that explains things as we see it. And again, this is certainly not coming to Australia at least this year. Even when it does, Australian internet just isn’t cut out for it. So expect a very, very bad time.

Until then, game to your heart’s desire on an Evatech customisable Gaming PC!

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$2000 Gaming PC Challenge

JB HIFI / Officeworks / Good Guys / Bing Lee VS Evatech

It pays to shop around, especially on big ticket items like gaming PCs! This isn’t news, but what happens when you compare an Evatech custom built to order gaming PC with an off the shelf pre-assembled in china option? The results might surprise you.

We get it. Custom built in Australia sounds expensive right? Logic says that should be true, but when you do your homework it’s a very different story. To illustrate this, we’ve done a little experiment. With $2,000 to spend we visited JB HiFi, Bing Lee & Officeworks to see how much bang for our buck we could get, then compared it to an Evatech custom gaming PC for the same price.

Initial Observations

The first thing we noticed when doing our comparison is that there wasn’t a lot of options to choose from when it came to a gaming desktop PCs. The second thing we noticed is that there were no options with ‘current-gen’ hardware! Several months after the launch of the 9th-gen Intel CPUs and RTX series GPUs, they were nowhere to be found.

Last but not least, we noticed a disturbing trend of only 12 month manufacturer warranties. Under Australian consumer rights laws this probably isn’t even legal but we think we know why they do it. We suspect it’s help the retailers push their ‘extended’ warranties. Essentially scaring you in to spending more money on something the law entitles you to anyway.

Setting the Rules

To make this as fair as possible we set of very basic ground rules.

  • We couldn’t exceed our $2000 budget
  • We had to choose the best value for money gaming PC without exception
  • All pricing and specifications were recorded on the same day (15/03/2019)
  • All options must be stand alone PCs, not bundled with peripherals or a monitor.
    • Initially this was done to try and ensure the fairest possible comparison and minimise subjectivity but it turned out none of the competitors offered such a bundle in this price range anyway.

The Comparison Chart

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

CPU

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

8th Gen 6-Core 8700 4.6GHz

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

8th Gen 6-Core 8400 4.0GHz

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

8th Gen 6-Core 8700 4.6GHz

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

9th Gen 6-Core 9600K 4.6GHz

RAM

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

16GB DDR4

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

8GB DDR4

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

16GB DDR4

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

16GB DDR4

Video Card

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

NVIDIA GTX 1060 3GB

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

NVIDIA GTX 1060 6GB

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

NVIDIA GTX 1060 6GB

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

NVIDIA RTX 2060 6G

(Up to 40% Faster than a GTX1060!)

SSD

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

128GB

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

128GB

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

256GB

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

500GB

Hard Drive

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

2TB

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

1TB

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

1TB

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

2TB

Operating System

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

Windows 10 OEM

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

Windows 10 OEM

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

Windows 10 OEM

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

Windows 10 Full Retail Licence

(Transferred)

WiFi

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

Warranty

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

1 Year

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

1 Year

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

1 Year

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

3 Years (Extendable to 5!)

Upgradable / Customisable?

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

Price

Officeworks (HP Omen i7)

$1888

JB HiFi (Acer Nitro N50 i5)

$1999

Bing Lee (Acer Nitro N50 i7)

$1999

Evatech (Custom PCID 138234)

$1999

The Results

For the tech savvy among you who understand what you’re looking at on the chart above, the results are pretty clear. For the sake of those who might not have a full understanding of what exactly they are looking at in the chart, we’ll break it down for you.

A crash course in PC gaming hardware metrics.

When it comes to gaming performance, they key contributor is the graphics card, as long as the CPU and RAM are not a bottleneck. The best way to compare graphics card performance is with a real world benchmark result. There are thousands of these available online, some from more reputable sources than others. We would recommend using well known and trusted independent hardware review websites like GamersNexus.net, TweakTown.com and Techspot.com

Here’s an example.

In modern gaming systems, 8GB of RAM is considered entry level, 16GB plenty and 32GB overkill. As for the CPU in a gaming PC, low end systems will get by with an i3, while mid range systems should ideally be paired with an i5 and only the highest end systems would need to bother with an i7 or i9.

There is a commonly held misconception when it comes to CPUs that higher “GHz” means more performance or that more cores means more performance. Both of which are both true in a way, but mostly false. “GHz” is a measurement of the CPU’s clock speed or ‘tick’ rate. 4GHz means the CPU cycles through a set of ‘instructions’ 4000000000 times a second. This doesn’t account for the number of instructions per cycle it can handle, also known as “IPC”. A CPU with a higher IPC and lower clock speed can outperform a lower IPC, higher clock rate competitor.

Furthermore, cores are something that will only contribute to performance if the application or game you are running actually utilises them. Most modern game engines really only make full use of the first 4 to 6 cores (sometimes less). This means in most games, a 4 core CPU and 6 or 8 core CPU with the same IPC and clock rate will perform practically the same when compared side by side.

Of course this is a very generalised guide and dependence will vary from game to game. That being said, for the vast majority of modern games, this is the widely accepted best practice.

Gaming Performance

First Place : Evatech (40+% Higher than 2nd Place)
This was an easy win, with second place not even coming close. The Evatech configuration blows the competition out of the water with it’s significantly higher performing GPU (video card). You can see one such example in Battlefield V with the benchmark chart shown above. It also has the highest performing gaming CPU of the bunch with the highest IPC.

Last Place : Officeworks (with JB HiFi not far behind)
With the slowest GPU (video card) in the pack, the Officeworks PC would perform the worse in most titles. The only exceptions being for the most RAM hungry or CPU dependant games like the Total War series or Civilisation in which the JB HiFi model would lose it’s much lower RAM capacity and lower end CPU.

Storage Capacity

A secondary consideration when it comes a gaming PC but an important one none the less. Each system being compared today comes with a primary SSD and secondary regular hard drive. For those of you unfamiliar with the difference SSDs are Solid State Drives. They are significantly higher performing when it comes to boot and load times, but don’t effect in game performance much. Hard drives are spinning mechanical platter storage devices that have are cheaper GB but much slower. Bare in mind that it’s not uncommon for sames to reach 60-70GBs once installed and patched these days, plus Windows itself will eat up 10GB+.

First Place: Evatech (2-4x more SSD storage capacity than the competition)
With 500GB of SSD storage you have plenty of storage space to install a bunch of all your favourite games without the need to uninstall others or resort to using the slower hard drive. Still not enough? Well there’s an extra 2TB of space for you to install your less frequently played games and applications on the secondary drive.

Last Place: JB Hi Fi
Sporting only 128GB on the primary drive (much of which will be already eaten up by the operating system and bloatware rubbish that will come pre-installed), you’ll have room for 1 or two big AAA games before you run out of space. This is something that the Officeworks system also suffers from but with double the secondary hard drive storage capacity it edges out the JB Hi Fi system to avoid a last place tie.

Warranty & Upgradability.

First Place : Evatech
Pretty clearly the winner in this category with the only system that allows upgrades and comes as standard with much more generous warranty policy than the competition. Free troubleshooting assistance from professionals who actually know what they are talking about. Much much longer warranty period and very reasonable out of warranty repair pricing. Everything you would expect and more, for a $2,000 investment.

Last Place : JB Hi-Fi, Officeworks, Bing Lee (3 way tie)
Is it because they use such lower end hardware that they can’t offer more than 12 months warranty? Is it all a scam to to try and rip you off further and help the big box retailers push their extremely pricey and often useless extended warranties? We suspect it’s mostly the latter, but there is also no doubt the hardware you get in an Evatech PC is far superior. Oh, want to upgrade in the future and keep your expensive investment up to date long term? Don’t even think about it, just buy a whole new one. Not only will attempting upgrades void your warranty but in a lot of cases you just simply can’t because they use non-standard hardware that’s simply not compatible with off the shelf gear.

In Summary (TLDR;)

Evatech

  • Far superior gaming performance
  • Higher quality latest-gen hardware
  • Upgradable
  • Much better warranty
  • Way better support
  • 100% customizable

Bing Lee, Office Works & JB-Hi Fi

  • None of the above
  • Overpriced
  • Lacklustre performance
  • Old last-gen hardware
  • Not custom or upgradable
  • Short warranty

Are we biased? Of course we are. But are we wrong? Well everything we mentioned above is true, verifiable and we stand by it 100%. The rest is up to you to decide. Bare in mind we specialise specifically in custom computers and have done so since our inception in 2013. The competition peddle their so called ‘gaming PCs’ next to staplers, toaster ovens and refrigerators. So is it really that big of a surprise that we would offer better quality, service and value? We don’t think so.

Not convinced? Give our store website a try at www.evatech.com.au and customise a PC today. It’s quick, easy, powerful, great value and packed with the latest hardware. All you have to do is lock in your order and our team builds, tests, setup and deliver your system to your door in a matter of days while you sit back and save time & money. What more could you want?

Categories
News

The Division 2 on PC [Gaming Review]

With the launch of the much anticipated Division 2 from Ubisoft today, initial feedback from trusted review sites online is trending pretty positive. Being essentially an online RPG, all we’re getting at this stage is first impressions. We’ll have to wait a until people have more time with the game and start reaching some of the deeper buried content until we start to get a full sense of everything it has to offer.

But is it better than the first game?

With out a doubt, yes. But does that mean it’s a good game overall? Well that’s were we need to go in to more detail. In almost every way, The Division 2 is an improvement over its predecessor. The world feels more full and interesting, the gun play and visuals are improved, enemy variance is better. Everything just feels like it’s had an extra layer of polish that the first game didn’t get. This all of course was to be expected, but in the world of gaming, it’s not something that can be taken for granted. Happily this time around the developers have delivered on those expectations.

How does it fare as a stand-alone game?

Being a stat and loot driven RPG shooter, the game really needs to success in delivering a meaningful progression system to the player. This means weapon and armour upgrades that actually have a real impact to gameplay. It also means unlocking player attributes that are more than just cosmetic or tiny imperceptible tweaks to an underlying stat system.

The Division 2 does this well, at least in the early hours of the game. To give you an idea, with the level cap at 30, we’re writing this article only having reached level 17 so far. There is still plenty of post ‘end-game’ content after the main story but in terms of meaningful progression you wouldn’t expect it to extend far past the level cap. New items are spaced well throughout the game, level progression actually means something, perks give you noticeable boosts.

Most importantly however (this being a third person shooter after all) is the weapons. This is a game where damage hit points come flying out of enemies when you hit them. Where armour actually makes a difference and hitting an enemy in the head will deal a lot more damage than blasting them in a toe. Damage, fire rate and accuracy of your weapon are probably the most important stats in the game. This makes upgrading your arsenal not only necessary but satisfying and a key driver to keep you playing.

The Good

Well as previously mentioned, the all important progression system is a big plus, the visuals are great and the game world is interesting. On top of all that, the gun-play (which is pretty crappy in the first game) is much improved with the audio and animations being punchier and enemy animations actually responsive and timely when getting hit.

Another positive addition to the game, and one we mentioned in the opening paragraph, is a much more varied range of enemies. The combination of size, speed, armour and weapons means you always have to be on your toes. Giant chainsaw wielding melee enemies lurk in narrow corridors while snipers may patrol big open areas. Different factions don’t only look different, but will have different critical hit areas, movement behaviours and weapons. This goes a long way in keeping the game-play feel fresh and less predicable.

The Bad

The game isn’t perfect by any means, but it’s far from bad. That being said, if you’re after a great immersive Tom Clancy worthy story, you might be a little disappointed. The characters are good but not great and the overarching plot is fairly predictable. There isn’t much in the way of side compelling stories to explore in the world beyond the main mission either. On the flip side, there is some pretty well done small segments of the game that stand out. These mostly centred around some fairly compelling and interesting villains.

Another issue we’ve encountered is the shotgun. It’s a simple game mechanic that hearkens as far back as the original Doom. Devastating at close range, useless and long range. That’s all it needs to be. Somehow in this particular game, it’s only one of those two things. At range the Shotgun is as you would expect, pretty useless. However, close up it’s somewhat effective but it barely deals any more damage that a regular rifle. This makes it essentially useless. A fairly small grievance and one that could easily be fixed in a patch, so at this point we’ll just wait and see.

To Summarise

In conclusion, we were presently surprised. The game is fun, it’s a big step up over the original and the down sides were only minor. This of course won’t be everyone’s cup of tea. For instance, if you’re a WoW player and not a fan of run and gun action shooters, it’s probably not for you. Likewise, if you’re a Call of Duty fan that likes twitch shooters with sub 1 second time to kill, this won’t be for you either. To summarise, if you like this genre blending style of game then you’ll probably enjoy the Division 2. Just don’t shell out $70 expecting it to be something that it isn’t.

Get a bit more of the picture with the official launch trailer

The Hardware Requirements

Being a very PC-centric game and being built for native 4K support this game can really put a strain on your gaming rig. Especially if you really want to max it out. Ubisoft’s own official hardware recommendations to play at 4K require an RTX2080 TI. Paired ideally with a high end i7-i9 current gen CPU and 16GB of RAM. You can take this with a grain of salt. The publishers recommendations are not always based on actual raw performance. That being said, in this case, they don’t appear to be far from the truth either.

If like most gamers, you’ll be playing at 1080P or 1440P you can get away with a GTX1070 or RTX2060 GPU. Paired with a high end i5 or Ryzen 7 CPU and 16GB of RAM to keep up. Bare in mind this is for high graphics pre-sets at 60FPS. Remember to keep a little headroom if you’re trying to reach higher frame rates on a high-refresh rate gaming monitor.

For you budget gamers out there, the minimum officially supported hardware specs are a GTX670 + i5-2500K with 8GB of RAM. This roughly equities to an i3-8100 and a GTX1050 TI. Expect to need to dial both the in game graphics settings and resolution down low to achieve a smooth frame rate.

Here is the full official list direct from Ubisoft for reference

The Division 2: Minimum system requirements – 1080p | 30 FPS

  • OS: Windows 7 | 8 | 10
  • CPU: AMD FX-6350 | Intel Core I5-2500K
  • RAM: 8 GM
  • GPU: Nvidia Geforce GTX 670
  • VRAM: 2 GB

The Division 2: Recommended system requirements – 1080p | 60 FPS 

  • OS: Windows 7 | 8 | 10
  • CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 1500X | Intel Core I7-4790
  • RAM: 8 GB
  • GPU: Nvidia Geforce GTX 970
  • VRAM: 4 GB

The Division 2: High system requirements – 1440p | 60 FPS 

  • OS: Windows 7 | 8 | 10
  • CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 1700 | Intel Core I7-6700K
  • RAM: 16 GB
  • GPU: Nvidia Geforce GTX 1070
  • VRAM: 8 GB

The Division 2: Elite system requirements – 4K | 60 FPS 

  • OS: Windows 7 | 8 | 10
  • CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X | Intel Core I9-7900X
  • RAM: 16 GB
  • GPU: Nvidia Geforce RTX 2080 TI
  • VRAM: 11 GB

Where to buy the Division 2 on PC in Australia

So how do you get your hands on a copy of the Division 2 for PC? Well in Australia it starts at $64.00 on Amazon or JB-Hi Fi. If you have a JB locally you can walk in and grab a copy on the spot. Not in a rush? If you have Amazon prime you get free delivery. Don’t want to leave the house? It’s just a few bucks more on the Epic Games store. Just don’t get ripped off at EB!

  • Amazon – $64
  • JB Hi-Fi – $64
  • Epic Games Store – $69.95
  • Ubisoft Store – $89.95
  • EB Games – $89.95

Customising a gaming PC for the Division 2

Don’t have a gaming PC up to the challenge? Well now you know what sort of hardware you’ll need to hit your desired gameplay experience, the next part is easy. Visit www.evatech.com.au and customise your next dream ‘Division 2’ ready gaming PC today. Australian built, high quality, latest gen gaming PCs built to order and delivered nation wide. Above all, it’s easy, powerful, amazing value and has great built in error checking and performance indicators.

Simply order online and our team will build, test, and deliver to your doorstep anywhere in Australia!